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Department of Pediatrics : Fellowship Programs : Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics : Subspecialty Residency Program

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Given the broad scope of DBP our program allows for a solid foundation which can then be tailored to a fellows evolving interest. In general, the DBP subspecialty resident spends the majority of his or her first year becoming familiar with typical and atypical child development and behavior (through reading, viewing of videotaped material, seminars, and discussions with staff) and gaining a variety of specialized clinical skills through didactic and clinical work with preceptors.   

Clinical experience in the first year is focused on the young child (ages 0-5) with a broad range of developmental-behavioral problems. Introductory courses in Epidemiology are usually taken during the first year. A personal scholarship oversight committee is formed in the first year and will help guide the fellow through their research and scholarly activities. The Core Curriculum Course for all long-term trainees focuses on a variety of issues related to the following:

  • DBP didactics
  • Leadership training
  • Research issues
  • Career development
  • Policy issues surrounding learning and developmental concerns
  • Early intervention
  • School-related program issues

During the second year, the fellow’s research interest and project are more finely honed, and 40% time is devoted to non-clinical activities. The project may be one initiated by the fellow, or a portion of a larger ongoing project under the preceptorship of one of the faculty. Clinical experience becomes more focused on school-age children. Instruction in autism spectrum disorders diagnostic evaluations is offered early in the 2nd year. Elective rotations complete the clinical experience during the 2nd year.  

During the third year of fellowship, the fellow again has 40% time devoted to research/non-clinical activities. Clinical experience is targeted toward the fellow’s specific interests. A leadership role for the other trainees is assumed during this year, with exposure to administrative functions. 

The DBP fellow also participates in the ongoing activities of the Pediatric Section within the division, such as the biweekly meetings (with didactic presentations), supervising medical students and house staff in their assessments of children, and giving teaching presentations to groups of medical and other graduate students.  Our ultimate goal is to prepare the DBP subspecialty resident for the broad range of clinical, research, and teaching skills called for in any future academic or other leadership position.